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  • Pre-School

    Kindergartens are ‘schools’ that provide a structured 3-year preschool education programme for children aged 3 to 6. The 3-year programme consists of Nursery, Kindergarten 1 and Kindergarten 2. Kindergartens function daily, five days a week, with schooling hours ranging from 3 hours to 4 hour...

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  • Primary

    SMALLER CLASS SIZE FOR PRIMARY 1 AND 2

    30 students per class for Primary 1 classes from 2005 and Primary 2 classes from 2006.

    Why are we doing this?

    • We recognise that students may have different starting points wh...

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    • Secondary

      places students in the Special, Express, Normal (Academic) or Normal (Technical) course according to how they perform at the PSLE. The different curricular emphases are designed to match their learning abilities and interests. ...

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    • Secondary

      All the facts you want to know for Secondary School. ...

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    • Secondary

      Community Involvement Programme (CIP) & Service Learning

      CIP nurtures our students to become socially responsible and develops their sense of belonging and commitment to our country. Through participating in community work, students also learn the v...

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    • Secondary

      DEVELOPMENTS IN THE N(A) COURSE

      DEVELOPMENTS IN THE N(T) COURSE

      ...

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    • Secondary

      • Integrated Programmes (IPs)
      • Bicultural Studies Programme (Chinese) [BSP/C] & Special Assistance Plan (SAP)
      • Elective Programme in Malay Language for Secondary Schools (EMAS)
      • Malay (Special Programme)/Chinese (Special Programme) [M(SP)/C(SP)]
      • Foreign La...

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      • Secondary

        POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION OPTIONS

        • Junior Colleges (JCs) and Centralised Institute (CI)
        • Polytechnics
        • Pre-School

          These are some questions you might like to ask yourself when selecting a kindergarten for your child. It would also be advisable to visit the kindergarten and meet the principal to find out more about the environment of the kindergarten, its programme and teachers.

           

          ...

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        • Pre-University

          THE INNER CIRCLE
          centring on life skills ensures that students acquire sound values and skills to take them through life as responsible adults and active citizens. It comprises the non-academic curriculum.

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Welcome to 12Study!

If you have the intention to improve yourself or your love ones, then this portal is for you!

We offer a wide spectrum of learning centers for you to choose from, ranging from schooling, to music, flower arrangements, dancing and even yoga classes! There is definitely something for everyone!

This is a one stop learning portal where we bring together the consumers and the sellers literally to pick and choose!

Once again, WELCOME!

 
History and controversy

Because of the complexity of the English alphabetic structure, more than a century of debate has occurred over whether English phonics ought to be taught at all. Beginning in the mid 19th century, some American educators, prominently Horace Mann, argued this point precisely. This led to the commonly used "look-say" approach ensconced in the "Dick and Jane" readers popular in the mid-20th century. Beginning in the 1950s, however, phonics resurfaced as a method of teaching reading. Spurred by Rudolf Flesch's polarizing, bombastic criticism of the absence of phonics instruction (particularly in his popular book, Why Johnny Can't Read) phonics resurfaced, but—owing to Flesch's polemical approach—the term "phonics" became associated with political ideology. The popularity of phonics rose, but many educators associated it with "back to basics" pedagogy and eschewed it.

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Basic rules

Alphabetic principle

English spelling is based upon the alphabetic principle, the idea that letters represent sounds. For example, the word pat is composed of three letters, p, a, and t, each representing a phoneme, respectively, /p/, /æ/, and /t/.[1] Some letters in English regularly represent one sound, such as b, m, and d. However, the alphabetic principle is not sufficient to represent all of the spellings in English.

 

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Different phonics approaches

Synthetic phonics is a method employed to teach phonics to children when learning to read. This method involves examining every spelling within the word individually as an individual sound and then blending those sounds together. For example, shrouds would be read by pronouncing the sounds for each spelling "/ʃ, ɹ, aʊ, d, z/" and then blending those sounds orally to produce a spoken word, "/ʃɹaʊdz/." The goal of synthetic phonics instruction is that students identify the sound-symbol correspondences and blend their phonemes automatically.

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Phonics in English

Phonics is a widely used method of teaching children to read, although it is not without controversy (see "History and controversy" below). Children begin learning to read using phonics usually around the age of 5 or 6. Teaching English reading using phonics requires children to learn the connections between letter patterns and the sounds they represent. Phonics instruction requires the teacher to provide students with a core body of information about phonics rules, or patterns.